Category Archives: Writing Career

The Pouting Pen … an article I wrote ten years ago.

 

The Pouting Pen

Think of me as “Dear Abby”, except I only give advice on your relationship with your pen, typewriter, word processor, or computer.  Are you suffering from writer’s block?  Uncertain of the definition of a writing term?  I’m here for you.  If I don’t know the answer, I will point you in the right direction.

I won’t be giving advice on anything to do with university assignments…if you are having difficulties with those, see your tutor or Student Services.

 

 

Dear Pouting Pen,

I am having trouble with finding a title for my novel.  Where do I look for and find a good title?

Signed,

Tongue-tied with Titles.

 

Dear TTT,

 

There are fashions in titles, just like everything else.

The classic book title takes the pattern of ‘(The) **** of (the) ****’. I can look over to my bookcase and see four such titles in that style: ‘The Dolphins of Pern’, ‘The Wheel of Time’, ‘The Mystery of the Ruby Glasses’, & ‘The Sword of Shanarra’. This could mean that this style is overdone, but it just means that it is a classic form. It works, so don’t knock it. Oh, and the ‘of’ may be an ‘and’ in some titles of this type, like ‘The Power and the Passion’.

Then there is the clean and simple use of a one word title. Gregory Maguire favours this type: ‘Lost’, ‘Wicked’. So do many other authors. It has the advantage that you can use words that have multiple meanings, and you don’t give away anything major of the plot. A single word title is strong and powerful. The addition of a ‘The’ in front of a single word doesn’t weaken the effect, like in ‘The Awakening’ or ‘The Bribe’. Next level is adding a modifier, like an adjective, e.g. ‘The Little Country’ or ‘The King’s Buccaneer’.

Quotes are often a good source of titles. ‘Band of Brothers’ is from Shakespeare…you can’t go wrong with Shakespeare as he covered everything about the human condition in his body of work. Personally, I like to use bits from old sayings: ‘Rosemary for Remembrance’, ‘Stuff and Nonsense’. You can use lyrics from songs, anything that gives your title meaning. You can also twist a saying, particularly if your book is a parody…’Wyrd Sisters’ by Terry Pratchett is an example. The cleverer the twist, and the more appropriate to your novel, can make this style of title a zinger.

Lately, there has been a flourish of longer titles. ‘The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time’ is an excellent example of this type. I avoid this style myself, but when it works it works well. The Victorians loved long titles, and they also liked to add a comment under the title. If you are writing Steam Punk or historical novels, this style is very suitable.

What a writer wants from a title is a cluster of words that are memorable; something that encompasses the theme of the work, without giving too much away. Some people like to put titles on their chapter headings (guilty). Titles are important, as a weak title can drive away readers before they even get to read the main text.

Some writers have a natural knack at picking a good title. If you know someone like this, cultivate their friendship. (Joke, joke.) However, you can work at your title to improve it, just like anything else. Make a huge list of titles, and cull down to the one you like. Use a working title, and then change it when something more appropriate takes your fancy. Buy book of quotations, or start looking up lyrics on the internet.

If you are getting too frustrated with finding a title, just leave it for a while. Come back when you are calm and relaxed. Reread your piece. Sometimes, the title will be hidden in the very words in your story.

 

 

Dear Pouting Pen,

 

I am unsure of the genre of my short story – in fact, I am unsure what genre really is.  Can you help me, please?

 

Yours in confusion,

Genre Geronimo

 

Dear Gerry,

Genre is how various categories of writing are recognised. Genre is a marketing tool, and a useful method for hunting down books you might enjoy, and it is used in judging books for awards. When you go into a book shop, usually the books are separated by genre: Cook Books, Humour, Reference Books, etc. These are very basic categories, often covering an enormous variation in the types of books lumped together. This is often why very original books, like Shaun Tan’s ‘The Arrival’, may end up in the children’s fiction area of a bookshop. No one knows what genre it should go into, because it covers so many genres.

Genre can be broad…Fantasy. Or it can get very specific, like Victorian-era, London-set, Steampunk fantasy aimed at a twelve year old audience. Every genre has its own rules and traditions, such as sword and sorcery genre books should have swordmen/swordwomen and wild magic as basic plot elements. Does that sound straight forward? It isn’t, as many genres overlap, and new genres are forming all the time.

For a writer, genre can be both restrictive and wonderful. Big Picture: I write Fantasy, and I dabble in horror and Science Fiction. I don’t think I will ever write a war-based novel or a Western. However, my fantasies tend to be adult fairytales in an urban setting. Little Picture: You might call it Urban Fantasy, or Magic Realism, or Feminist Fairytales. I wouldn’t.

I don’t like to be pigeonholed, as it restricts what I can or can’t do. However, if I was going to market such a book to a publisher, I would pick one of those genres so that the publisher has some idea of my style. And booksellers will know to put it in the Fantasy bookcases in their stores.

But what if I wanted to write a science fact book, when I am known as a fantasy author? If I am a popular fantasy writer, publishers may reject this out-of-genre book, as my fan base might be unhappy. Ditto if I write young adult, and then I write a book aimed at an older audience. Of course, I can change to another pen name…but why should any author be so restricted creatively?

There are any number of good books that can help with an understanding of genre. This note is just a starting point, to get you thinking.

 

Dear Pouting Pen,

 

Who the heck is an unreliable narrator?

 

Yours Sincerely,

This is not for an assignment, honest.

 

 

Dear Honest,

Erm.  Instead of giving you an outright definition of an unreliable narrator, I will share with you my personal views on unreliable narration.  You can then make up your own mind who or what an unreliable narrator is.

There is a perception in our society that some texts are reliable, and some texts are not. I would argue that no text can be constructed as completely reliable, as it is human nature to pick and choose what facts will be represented. The presentation of the facts, what order they are in, what has been left out, are all constructs of the author of a text.

The news story reported by a respected journalist; the critique of a historical event by an academic; and the article presented by a scientist; all these texts are just as unreliable as the authors. Each individual has chosen their topic, which means they have ignored other topics. They have decided how to represent the topic, highlighting some issues and ignoring others. No matter how unbiased the text may appear, there will be gaps and ambiguities – because the authors are not omniscient and are only human.

As well, truth can not be set in stone. What is consider only right and normal in one time and place, will be seen as strange or criminal somewhere and somewhen else. The truth itself may change. This means that a reader should never passively accept a text on face value. The reader should remain alert and question the text. She should look for gaps in the meaning, for what is left out is often as telling as what has been included in the text. What is the context? What was the author of the text trying to achieve? What constraints are their on the author and the text?

Of course, the author of a text may be deliberately setting out to misinform or mislead the reader. However, most authors of a text have attempted to supply the text in good faith. It is up to the reader to stay open-minded, and try to avoid accepting any text as the complete and utter truth of the matter.

Sorry, Honest.  I’m aware that I haven’t given you a straight forward answer…so am I a reliable narrator?  Or not?

 

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Filed under The Writing Life, Uncategorized, Writing Career, Writing Experiment, Writing Style

Update on Lynne’s Writing

My goal this Australian Financial year is to achieve 100 rejections. This means I have to send out stuff on a weekly basis, at least two submissions a week on average. Over a month, I lean towards submitting ten items or more. Over twelve months, that is 120 submissions, but that doesn’t mean 120 rejections.

Often, I never hear back from the smaller anthologies and magazines.

However, in the past month, I have received two very encouraging rejections for one story. One of the rejections pointed out that they thought the story was more suited to a younger audience than their target audience, even though they loved it. I found that comment exceedingly helpful, and I have now submitted that story to a children’s magazine.

As well, one of my stories is on the shortlist for acceptance into the Andromeda Spaceways magazine, having passed their three reading levels. If they have a space for it, it will be accepted. They informed me that only one in twenty stories get to this level, so I am pleased and excited.

These aren’t the only wins I’ve had over the past year.

With this in mind, I am already planning for next year, even though it is over two months away. I will still aim for 100 rejections, but I will also aim for a minimum of six acceptances over the space of a year – one acceptance every two months. And I hope to start sending out novels as well as short stories. I think a novel being accepted will count as three acceptances; what do you think?

 

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Filed under Personal experience, Uncategorized, Writing Career

Exciting times

What a week! The high point was being picked from 10,000 entries to have my fifteen minutes of fame on a QWC billboard. I stalked those billboards until I saw my story … and then stalked them some more to get pictures.
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I had a epiphany for a motivation for my antagonist in the train book. I haven’t been getting too many words down, just plotting how I am moving forward and getting my ducks in a row for the next big push.
I sent off several submissions and query letters this week, mainly for short stories and my nonfiction bug book.
Because of GenreCon, I have been working on a career plan, and now have a vague outline for a one year plan, two year plan, and five year plan. I was to work at diversifying my income. So, I am working towards making a submission for running a workshop next year (second half). I am looking at setting up a professional author website and starting a newsletter. I will be looking overseas for an agent (or two).
So, I have four books I want to be doing the rounds by the end of next year. I still want to aim for 100 rejections (and I am well on track to make that this year). I may self-publish a short story collection. And I want to be more helpful with the next anthology – which will help me with my own dabbling in self publishing.
On a social note, I spent a wonderful four hours with my fellow writer and a member of the Springfield Writers Group, Megan, going over our GenreCon notes and sharing titbits of knowledge. Even if we had attended all the same sessions  – which we didn’t – we had different perspectives on what the panellists were saying.
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Megan and me, getting photos taken for our marketing package for our anthology.

So, life is exciting right now. In the next two weeks, the writers group has the official launch of our anthology.

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Filed under 8 Word Story, Anthology, Personal experience, Queensland Writers Centre, The Writing Life, Uncategorized, Writing Career

And so this happened…today!

Herston

Currently, the Queensland Writers Centre has a great little promotion going: 8 Word Story. They have had over 10,000 entries and I was one of the lucky ones chosen to go up on the billboards. I get my fifteen minutes of fame in 5 second spurts over the course of a day, the 23rd of November, on nine billboards around Brisbane City.

They talk about having your name in lights! It is exciting!

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Filed under 8 Word Story, Personal experience, Queensland Writers Centre, The Writing Life, Uncategorized, Writing Career

Latest Anthology with a Steampunk Story by Me!

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This anthology will be launched on the 7th of December. I will put up the link to purchase it then.

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Filed under Anthology, Book Launch, Bookface, Steampunk, Steampunk Author, Steampunk Genre, Steampunk Writer, Writing Career

Greetings from Novel World

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Greetings and Felicitations. I’ll bet your wondering where I’ve been?

I’ve been spending more time out in the garden, exercising, and writing. Yes. Writing. Writing short stories and sending them off to market, writing articles, writing job applications (still no luck), volunteering for the Queensland Writers Centre, and getting ready to write my new novel – nicknamed the Train Book. I started writing it this week, now that I have enough reseach under my belt, and I have written my timeline and outline.

But what about my Steampunk novel, you ask?

It is ‘resting’. There is a point in the editing process when need to stop. I could edit forever. The Steampunk novel still needs work, but at the moment I need to step away from it and gain some perspective again. I was ‘fussing’ rather than editing. I keep wanting to add in new stuff. I need to look at the story, write a new outline, and STICK TO IT!

I hope to have the Train Novel’s first draft written by Christmas. I’m aiming at 120,000 words. (And no, I’m not doing NaNoWriMo, even though I could). I’m looking writing at 10,000 words a week for twelve weeks. That is approximately 1500 words a day, which is doable. I’m on a writing high at the moment.

However, I know I have severely neglected this blog. And I can’t promise that things are going to change too soon. However, I will TRY to update you all once ot twice a week.

In other news … my hair is now green-blue. I am losing weight, but I still have no neck and no waist.Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, glasses, selfie, close-up and indoor

 

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Filed under the Muse, The Train Book, The Writing Life, Uncategorized, writing, Writing Career

Adverb Liberation Front

I don’t know why, but the ‘don’t use adverbs’ rule irritates me. Abverbs are just another thingamajig in a writer’s toolkit. Yes – they can be overused. Yes -they should be replaced by strong verbs when the strong verb is more appropiate. But adverbs can be just as useful as any other word family of our modern syntax.

adverbs

I suspect the real reason why adverbs are viewed with suspicion is that they are usually crutch words. Everyone knows to avoid ‘very’ and ‘really’. ‘Actually’ is one of my crutch words, and is an offender for a lot of other people. I now run ‘actually’ through my word search function when I complete a story; even though I am aware of the problem, it still turns up.

crutch word cloud

Crutch words – the usual suspects

Some people work on the rule ‘one adverb a page’ Some writers refuse to use adverbs at all. It is time to change this outdated way of thinking! So I have formed the ADVERB LIBERATION FRONT. Writers should be able to use any word they want! With confidence! Lovingly.

The only time a writer should avoid adverbs is when a writer is feeling lazy and using them to do all the heavy lifting in their prose. Think of adverbs as a condiment; a few adds to the flavour, but too many ruins the dish.

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Filed under The Writing Life, Uncategorized, Writing Career, Writing Style