Category Archives: Interview

An Interview with Karen J. Carlisle, Steampunk Author.

What was your introduction to the Steampunk genre?

My introduction to steampunk was a slow process. The seeds were planted early on, after re- reading a few classic Victorian science fiction stories and new ‘alternate history’ science fiction books, intertwining two of my passions – historical fantasy and science fiction. A run of steampunk inspired movies followed, in the early 2000s, fed a growing curiosity and intrigued my inner costumer. I started collecting bits to assemble my own costume. By 2006, my obsession had bloomed with my first steampunk costume – an explorer. I literally had a ball (at the annual Australian Costumers’ Guild Ball). I could indulge in my love of research, creating accurate period costumes, and let my imagination run wild with the fantasy elements.

What inspires you to write in the Steampunk genre?

I could never decide which genre I preferred – in costuming or reading. Now I get to mash them all up – fantasy, science fiction and history – in one fell swoop. How exciting! I can play with a familiar setting, create my own alternate world and posit what if with historical events. What is there not to love?

Did you set out to write Steampunk, or did it just happen?

I started out writing a fantasy story and got side tracked by several other (steampunk) ideas. My first series, The Adventures of Viola Stewart, is more gaslamp fantasy, than pure steampunk. The original fantasy story is just biding its time…

Do you write in other genres? If so, what attracted you to those genres?

I also write fantasy and gaslamp. There is even a science fiction-comedy manuscript hidden away somewhere…

How did you come to choose your protagonist and antagonist?

They found me.

In 2013, I was having issues with work stress. I decided to rekindle my dream of writing, and use it as a cathartic exercise. I got told: ‘Write what you know’. Viola became a nineteenth century optician, frustrated with being unable to follow her chosen career path. My latest antagonist, Doctor Jack, was inspired by a documentary. I disagreed with some of the reasoning behind their suspect choice. I researched other options and thought:
What if it was all planned? Who would have planned it? Who would they get to perpetrate such deeds, and why would someone agree to such an undertaking? Doctor Jack was born

Do you write backstories for your characters?

Yes. Some are detailed, with family trees and detailed major events in their lives. Other character backgrounds start out with just the basics required for the plot. It is organic. It grows as the characters introduce themselves – sometimes becoming epic. (Not that you get to see all of it)

Are you a ‘planner’ or a ‘winger’ when it comes to plotting your narratives?

I am mostly a ‘winger’ (or ‘pantser’) – at least at the start. As the story unfolds, I need to start planning. Initially, I used to plan the ending (or a major turning point) and only one or two chapters ahead. I recently did a writing course on plot and writing. I plan a lot more now. My costume cupboard door is sometimes covered in sticky notes. But, whether I plan or not, the stories always change. They are fluid, always changing as my imagination and characters take over. So really, I am still winging it really, but I now I often have a contingency plan for when I get sidetracked.

If you are a planner, do you stick strictly to your plan?

Heck, no! I am always being side-tracked.

What is more important to you: that the characters conform to your plot, or that the plot grows naturally out of the characters?

Technically characters are more important in any story. They need to be believable. But in reality, which comes first will depend on my muse. Sometimes I have an idea for a story, often a scene; sometimes just a feeling. Characters then introduce themselves, but not always when I want nor who I want. At other times, the characters present me with their story and challenge me to write it. They can be wilful.

Do you set time aside to write every day?

Yes. When I started on this journey, I fell back on my training and did the scientific thing. I researched what I needed to do to give myself the best chance of success. Early on, I read some advice: Read or write 1500 words a day. It has served me well.

I try to write at least five days a week. For the first twelve months, I entered competitions regularly. The deadlines helped create a habit of regular writing. Now I have set writing times, usually between 10am-2.30pm. Sometimes the muse attacks me late at night, so I keep a notebook by the bed.

Do you set yourself a word length to write every day?

If I have a deadline, yes. I have found NaNoWriMo to be helpful in pushing me to increase my daily word count. I have an ideal but find 1000 words a day is a comfortable stretch.

However, as a general rule, I try to complete a set writing task – a specific scene or solve a specific problem.

Do you write with a word length in mind, or do you let the story dictate the length?

The story dictates it. Doctor Jack was supposed to be a short story of about 10,000 words. As I developed the characters, I found the story demanded more and ended up at 36,000 words. The Department of Curiosities was originally projected to be roughly 80,000 words but will most likely end up being possibly 85,000. If I was a better planner, I could possibly control word count more accurately. Or so I am told.

How important is research to you and your Steampunk Narratives?

I am a research fiend. I research historical events, characters, science, costume. And not just for the sake of constructive procrastination. I love learning new things. It gives me ideas (and is great for quiz nights). I have maps of 19th century London, photos of houses and portraits of people. I have found original period scientific papers presented to the Royal Society (of Science). I have at least one box of notes per story/series.

For The Adventures of Viola Stewart, I have researched dirigibles, the colour of gases under electricity, colours of smoke produced by various explosives and optograms. I attended a museum lecture on Daguerreotypes and Victorian Post-Mortem Photography, and have delved into the world of Jack the Ripper, and even walked the virtual streets of London via Google Earth.

Did I mention I love research?

Do you use online resources to help you write and research? Can you make recommendations of any websites you find particularly helpful?

Here are just a few:

Do you have any favourite Steampunk authors?

 Gail Carriger. I am also waiting (not so patiently) for Jim Butcher’s upcoming Steampunk novel.

Do you have any favourite Steampunk movies?

Movie? Hard decision. I do love the television series Murdoch Mysteries. It has a Steampunk flavour in many of its stories.

Are you part of a Steampunk community? If so, do they inspire your writing in any way?

Steampunk SA – costumers, some of who have given their time and enthusiasm as beta readers, cover and book trailer models and loaned out their costumes. Steampunk Empire: There is a writers group in SE- all very supportive denizens.

I know you cosplay Steampunk outfits. Was this a conscious decision or did it grow out of your enthusiasm for the Steampunk Literary Genre?

I was cosplaying Steampunk-inspired outfits before I really knew it was called Steampunk. Next the house redecorated with the Steampunk Aesthetic, and then – finally – there came the Steampunk genre writing.

Tell us about your current Steampunk Book.
My first novella, Doctor Jack, is coming out as ebook, following after three short stories. A compilation paperback is due out at the end of the month. The Adventures of Viola Stewart Journal #1: Doctor Jack and Other Tales.

I am just finishing up the first draft of my first novel-length story, The Department of Curiosities, hopefully out at end of the year. Just in time for Christmas!

Do you have an online presence? 

  • website and blog: htt://karencarlisle.purplefiles.net

mirror website on WordPress: https://karenjcarlisle.wordpress.com/blog/

Advertisements

8 Comments

Filed under Australian Steampunk Author, Books & reading, Interview, Steampunk, Steampunk Feminist

An Interview with E. Chris Garrison: Steampunk Author!

Book cover for Chris

  1. What was your introduction to the Steampunk genre?

I blame my interest in the genre on William Gibson and Bruce Sterling for their collaborative novel, The Difference Engine. I’d been a fan of Gibson’s for his Cyberpunk novels, and the book came out during my last year in college, where I was studying computer systems engineering. Since it was about computing being invented over a hundred years earlier, I was fascinated. I will admit that despite that early start, I didn’t follow Steampunk again for decades when it gained more prominence as a genre of its own.

  1. What inspires you to write in the Steampunk genre?

I write the kind of stories I like to read, and Steampunk inspires me as a pure form of speculative fiction. It can be written as science fiction, fantasy, or both. The roots of my favorite genres were born with Verne, Shelley, Burroughs, Wells, and Poe. Those original science fiction and fantasy authors dreamed of a future that never was, and it’s easy to get caught up in that alternate reality.

  1. Did you set out to write Steampunk, or did it just happen?

It was an accident, I promise! Well, sort of. I had the idea of writing a novel about a character who can hop from one alternate reality to another through the use of quantum states, as in quantum computing. The idea rattled around in my head for years. I pitched ideas to my critique group, I jotted down notes, but nothing gelled for a long time. Finally, I sat down and made up some characters and started writing, to see what would happen. The first time the main character world-hopped, I had to think fast to provide a contrasting alternate history. Steampunk floated up as an ideal candidate, because it is a very visually different world from our own, and one that I could fill with swashbuckling airship-pirate action. That book became Reality Check, which is my best selling book to date.

  1. Do you write in other genres? If so, what attracted you to those genres?

I write in a few speculative fiction genres.

My first three novels, the Road Ghosts Trilogy, are supernatural fantasies, though they’ve also been called “horror lite”. I never intended to write horror, and I still maintain it is urban fantasy. I’ve been a big fan of urban fantasy as a fan of Charles de Lint’s Newford stories, Jim Butcher’s Dresden Files, and the Buffy the Vampire Slayer TV series. My wife and I were ghost hunters for seven years, and so I wrote my urban fantasy involving supernatural entities like ghosts, demons, and ghouls.

That series spun off into the Tipsy Fairy Tales, which are more pure magical comedic/action contemporary fantasy stories, which still owes a lot to Buffy’s wry sense of humor and sense of pacing.

I mentioned my science fiction novel, Reality Check, and all I can say about that is, I grew up on a diet of Heinlein, Asimov, Niven, and McCaffrey. And yeah, you’ll catch Star Wars references in most of my books. It’s a weakness, I can’t help it.

  1. How did you come to choose your protagonist and antagonist?

In Girl in the Gears, my main characters literally came to me in a dream. I dreamed of a young transgender woman on the run with an Artful Dodger type mentor, in an airship without a ladder. For some reason, they had to fly up to tall structures, like the masts of ships, to climb down. (It was a dream, don’t ask me.) I woke up at 2 in the morning and scribbled down everything I could remember on our grocery list pad, and was so excited about the concept that I dropped my work in progress to start on the new idea.

The story is, in part, about the struggles a transgender woman might have in a world without even a word for transgender, without any support network or medical assistance for such a person. For that story arc, I had to make the antagonist someone very much opposed to her path to live as a woman, and so I decided it was her father who could not accept her as a woman, and who would try to drag her kicking and screaming, if necessary, back into a more “respectable” position in life. He is forced to work from afar, through agents, so the Trans-Continental aspect is due to her being chased across several of the balkanized republics of North America. Luckily, she has help, though her Artful Dodger friend has problems of her own.

  1. Do you write backstories for your characters?

Not really. I jot down notes as things occur to me, or as they come up in the story. The characters tend to reveal themselves over time.

  1. How do your own experiences add to your characters and narratives?

In the case of Trans-Continental, my experiences growing up transgender, but not knowing a word for it, or really understanding why I was different, helps me create the character of Ida, who’s trans in a world also without a word like that. She’s otherwise quite different from me: bolder, braver, more outgoing. Duffy’s even further from me in most ways, she’s cocky and tricky, but their loyalty to each other speaks to the kind of friendship I value.

  1. Are you a ‘planner’ or a ‘winger’ when it comes to plotting your narratives?

I started out more of a “winger” (in my circles, we call it “pantsing” as in writing by the seat of your pants), but have learned to do a minimum of planning to make sure the story stays on track. For novella or novel length works, I usually write a sort of headline of what should happen in each chapter ahead of time to keep the overall pacing working toward the end, even if I’m not 100% sure how it will end. I prefer having that skeletal framework to flesh things out on.

  1. If you are a planner, do you stick strictly to your plan?

Ha, definitely not! For Reality Check, I had to rewrite the plan three times while writing it, and after beta readers agreed the ending felt abrupt, I added even more on the end. Often the plan will start out with holes that need filling in, and sometimes whole unplanned chapters will become necessary to be inserted as my characters do unexpected things.

  1. What is more important to you: that the characters conform to your plot, or that the plot grows naturally out of the characters?

My stories are, as a rule, character-driven. The plot has to follow naturally based on who they are, and how they interact. If I force a character to do something that’s out of their nature, it is as if the muse responsible for the story goes on strike and my writing goes flat. So I listen to my characters, they know their story, I let them reveal it.

  1. Do you set time aside to write every day?

I wish. No, I’m more of a binge writer. Which isn’t all bad. I learned I could write novels by participating in National Novel Writing Month, which is the bingeiest binge that ever binged a binge. But I’m working to change my habits to a more moderate and constant pace. Girl in the Gears was written like this, and I think it helped me keep the story always in mind without having to put the rest of my life on hold until it was done. I’ve been in an editing/promotion phase since then, but hope to get back to a regular writing schedule soon.

  1. Do you set yourself a word length to write every day?

Sort of. The plan that’s worked best so far has been to challenge myself to write 10,000 words in a month. That’s an average of 333 words a day, and I know I can write 1000 words in an hour when I’ve got momentum. I’ve written a 500 word flash fiction story in 15 minutes, even. So this is a modest goal, and even if I have to do all my writing on the weekend, I can catch up. This flexible writing goal suits my life and personality best, it seems.

  1. Do you write with a word length in mind, or do you let the story dictate the length?

Hmm. I usually know if I’m writing a flash story, short story, novella, or novel when I sit down at the keyboard, based on the idea that the story comes from. Some stories just don’t work in that framework, and end up getting reworked. For instance, one night I dreamed about my Road Ghosts characters and jotted down what I remembered of the dream. I tried to write a short story based on it, but it just wouldn’t work for me. Eventually, that became the first chapter of the second Road Ghosts novel, Sinking Down, because the problem was, the idea demanded a lot more than a short story (and I changed the point of view, too). But that’s an exception, rather than the rule, for me.

  1. How important is research to you and your Steampunk Narratives?

I think most people who read this question expect the answer to be an ambitious, “Of course research is paramount! Detail is everything in Steampunk!” This is where I differ. My Steampunk world is an alternate reality that’s set right NOW, not a hundred years ago. History, especially science, took a different turn around the time of Newton, and so the spread and adoption of technology has gone very differently. Yes, I do research, but I don’t let my imagination be fettered by historical events or fashions, since the canvas of history in my Trans-Continental world is painted with a different brush.

  1. Do you use online resources to help you write and research? Can you make recommendations of any websites you find particularly helpful?

Google is my friend. I use Google Maps for geography, but also I search for historical maps, original names of towns, ancestry of historical figures, the progress of fashion, the dates technologies were invented, and so on. I was delighted to stumble upon your site, because the articles you write and share are fuel for my imagination for this genre.

  1. Do you have any favourite Steampunk authors?

I am a huge fan of Katina French’s Clockwork Republics stories (Steampunk fairy tales!). I am fortunate to have her as a friend and colleague. She can also tighten a corset to within an inch of your life, as I found out on our expedition to the Steampunk World’s Fair last year!

  1. Do you have any favourite Steampunk movies?

You know, if for nothing else, I adore the Robert Downey Jr Sherlock Holmes movies for their soundtrack! Hans Zimmer captured the Steampunk style in musical form with quirky instruments and a breakneck pace that I played on repeat while writing Girl in the Gears. I’m not certain that the movies qualify for most as true Steampunk, but I think they capture the spirit of the genre quite well.

  1. Are you part of a Steampunk community? If so, do they inspire your writing in any way?

I’ve attended the Indianapolis Aerodrome’s Steampunk Sunday gathering, and would like to do more with that group. I run into a lot of them at local conventions. I think inspiration comes more from friends I have in that group, through their latest costumes and inventions. They’re a creative bunch, and I’m thrilled to be among them.

  1. Tell us about your current Steampunk Book – which is due out on the 1st of June

Well, I have cleverly dropped tidbits about my latest in the questions above! But the short of it is, Trans-Continental: Girl in the Gears is a novella that’s the first in a planned series of Steampunk adventures starring Ida, a transgender woman, and her larcenous-but-loyal companion, Duffy. They are running from their respective pasts together across the military-industrial landscape of the North American Republics, which are working up toward multinational war. As my friend Moxie Magnus says, “[Ida and Duffy] put the ‘team’ back in Steampunk”.

I mentioned that my science fiction book, Reality Check, has a steampunk setting. It is that same alternate reality that I’ve used as the setting for the Trans-Continental series. I haven’t decided if there will be any direct crossovers, but they do share that common world-building.

  1. Do you have an online presence?  

But of course! There’s even a Steampunk story about that.

I deliberately avoided saying the word “Steampunk” anywhere in Reality Check. Instead, the main character, Lee Green, thinks of the Trans-Continental universe as the ‘silly hat world’ because to his modern, practical eyes, the flamboyant fashion of the neo-Victorian alternate reality is pretty silly. He even thinks of the alternate version of his love interest as “Silly Hat Dionne”.

So, when I revamped my website awhile ago, I gave it a new domain name: http://sillyhatbooks.com

I would welcome anyone who’s made it this far to come visit me there, or follow me on Twitter at @ecgarrison.

Thank you again for having me as a guest!

Chris in Steampunk cosplay

Chris in Steampunk cosplay

1 Comment

Filed under Interview, Steampunk Author