Napoleon Bonaparte’s flintlock pistol

As part of the characterization of my antagonist in my Steampunk novel, my villain is a huge fan of Napoleon. I think it would be quite in character for him to carry this little pistol. It suits the flamboyance and drama of his nature quite well.

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4 Comments

Filed under Antagonist, Characterization, Steampunk Work-in-Progress

4 responses to “Napoleon Bonaparte’s flintlock pistol

  1. Cute.
    Also – a flintlock. Presumably all three barrels fired simultaneously. Its range (and power) would have been pathetic.

    There are many Youtube video demonstrating how to load, prime, and finally fire various old gunpowder weapons. The reloading times were painfully slow.
    Any decent steampunk writer needs to know their gunions, so to speak. Particularly to know when each innovation came into general use, and what technological advances were essential to enable said innovations.
    Some were not what one would expect. Who amongst know what a ‘shot tower’ was, for example, and how it was worked. How saltpeter was made. How cannons were tested. Interesting stuff like that. Mad scientist didn’t do this. they were usually sane, boring, methodical people.

    • I was thinking of the gun more as a keepsake than as a weapon, as a hint to him being the Napoleon of Crime. As a copyright issue, I can’t straight out call him Moriarty, so I have to build up his characterization with these hints.
      However, I do agree with you about having an understanding of your science. I am currently giving myself headaches learning about ships, boats, and submarines.
      And I am pleased to that I do know what a shot tower is. There is a preserved specimen in Melbourne!

  2. Also, who wouldn’t want to carry that? It’s gorgeous.

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